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Cleaning Up a Rental Property in Chicago? Dumpster Rental Tips

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Commercial Waste, Residential Waste, Trash Tips

If you have to clean up a rental property after a tenant has left, you have a big job ahead of you. A dumpster rental can help you easily dispose of waste; often, this speeds up the renovation process. Before you get started, read the following tips.

  1. Line Up Contractors Before Choosing a Dumpster

Assuming you’re planning to do some work on the house and you’re going to be hiring some professionals, meet with all contractors before choosing a dumpster.

Dumpster rentals typically last for seven days, although you may be able to extend your rental if the situation requires it. Having all contractors come in to do their work within this seven-day period is the easiest way to ensure easy disposal of remodeling debris.

10 Ways to Save Money on Your Commercial Dumpster Rental

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Commercial Waste

Commercial dumpster rental can be costly, especially if you’re planning a large remodel. Savvy shoppers can save money by planning right and staying organized. These 10 tips help you spend less money on your dumpster rental, so you can spend more money on your commercial remodel.
  1. Narrow Down the Timeline for When You’ll Need a Dumpster
You may not need a dumpster for the duration of the entire remodel. You’ll either pay for your dumpster by the day, by the week, or by the month, depending on your needs. If you can shave time off of your rental, you can save money. Communicate with your contractor to find out details like when the remodel will begin, when a dumpster rental will become necessary, and about how long the dumpster rental will be needed. This will help you avoid paying for more time than is necessary.

5 Ways to Make Roofing-Material Waste Removal Easier

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Commercial Waste, Residential Waste, Trash Tips

An on-site dumpster is a definite time-saver when you have to rip off old shingles and install a new roof. But, you have several other ways to make your re-roofing job more efficient and problem-free. Whether you’re a roofing contractor or you plan to replace your own roof, follow these five tips for easy and safe roofing waste removal.
  1. Have a Plan for Roofing Waste
In some parts of Illinois, you can dispose of used shingles yourself by dumping the waste materials at a landfill. However, if a landfill is located close to a shingle-recycling facility, the landfill may not be able to accept old shingles. Check the local laws and ordinances regarding roofing-material disposal before you order any roofing-related dumpsters. In some cases, if your shingles have asbestos, you must hire a licensed roofing contractor to remove and dispose of used roofing materials.

Looking to Reduce Waste? Keep Calm and Compost

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Residential Waste, Trash Tips

If you want ways to reduce how many trash bags you send to the curb each week, you might already actively recycle and reuse items instead of throwing them away. However, if you want to reduce your waste even further, you might look into composting.

Making your own compost can be rewarding. By choosing to compost, you help to reduce your ecological footprint and create a resource that gives back to the environment. Learn more about how composting can benefit your household and how you can get started.

Benefits of Composting

Did you know that around half of the garbage that people put in the trash can each week is compostable? Food scraps make up half of all compostable discarded waste, but yard trimmings, paper and cardboard, and even scraps of wood are compostable materials. Sending these items to the compost instead of to the landfill offers some amazing benefits.

8 Dangers of DIY Tire Disposal | Tri-State Disposal

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Commercial Waste, Residential Waste

Waste tires are a persistent and widespread problem in the United States. Many individuals assume that they can handle tire disposal on their own, either by stockpiling used tires on their land or by dumping tires in unregulated areas.

In our previous blog, “Tire Recycling Options and Why They Matter,” we discussed the astonishing statistics about waste tires and the benefits of recycling tires rather than sending them to a landfill or disposing of them yourself.

How to Prepare Common Items for Recycling

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Recycling, Residential Waste

You’ve probably already heard many of the reasons recycling is a good idea. You might even know that recycling one ton of aluminum saves 14,000 kWh of energy or that recycling one ton of glass prevents the release of 7.5 pounds of air pollutants.

How to Prepare Common Items for Recycling

But there’s a difference between knowing something is good and actually doing it. Perhaps recycling intimidates you because you’re not sure which items are recyclable. You might also wonder how you actually go about recycling items around your house.

Fortunately, recycling can be simple if you follow these preparation tips for various recyclable items.

Cans and Jars

If you drink soda or eat canned food regularly, you likely go through quite a few cans every week. Fortunately, you can recycle them. At recycling plants, cans are melted and turned into new cans and other products.

4 Ways to Demolish a Building

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Uncategorized

Demolition work may sound like fun—after all, who doesn’t like to take things apart and make a mess once in a while? However, demolition involves far more than just hitting things to see how they break. In fact, demolition is a tightly regulated industry and process since it has the potential to be very dangerous.

4 Ways to Demolish a Building

Depending on the area and the building that needs to be torn down, professionals will use different techniques to safely get rid of the existing structure. Learn four common demolition techniques and when they’re used—and if you need demolition services, make sure to contact a professional like Tri-State Disposal Inc. instead of trying it yourself.

  1. Implosion

Implosion demolitions are the flashiest way to get rid of an existing structure. Demolition professionals carefully place explosives to knock out a building’s structural supports, causing it to collapse in on itself. The process is very effective and takes very little time.

4 Ways to Encourage Your Community to Recycle

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Recycling

You and your family understand the importance of recycling. You carefully sort your paper, plastics, and aluminum. Whenever possible, you reuse plastic bags and repurpose old items around the home so they serve a new function. And you buy products made from recycled materials.

However, you feel that your efforts are outweighed by your neighbors’ negligence. Though you try hard to recycle on your own, many in your community don’t seem to care about protecting the environment. And many more don’t even bother to throw their trash in the dumpster, let alone take their recyclable items to the nearest center.

What Happens to the Items I Recycle?

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Commercial Waste, Recycling, Residential Waste

You recycle because you know it’s the right thing to do. You know recycling benefits your community and the environment. But each time you recycle a can, a bottle, or a newspaper, you wonder what happens to it. Was recycling worth it?

Here, we’ll go over some of the most common recyclable materials and their journey beyond the recycling bin.

Metal

Two types of metal-aluminum and steel-are recycled and reused every day. You’ve probably recycled aluminum cans many times. When you do, these cans go to a smelter, where employees grind the aluminum into small chips, melt it, and send it to a manufacturing plant. At the plant, workers roll new sheets of aluminum. Out of these sheets, they create new aluminum products. These products include:

  • Cans
  • Car bodies
  • Aluminum foil

Now, how about steel? You might not know that tin cans are actually made of steel and coated in tin. When you recycle a tin can, manufacturers flatten it and remove the tin coating. They sell the steel to a steel mill, where manufacturers create other steel products. These products could include appliances, steel beams, and car parts.

What about the tin coating? Well, people can reuse that, too, particularly in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

Glass

You may wonder how your glass products are reused, especially if they have chips or cracks. Fortunately, a broken bottle is not a problem. Manufacturers crush recycled glass into small pieces. People use crushed glass as part of the following:

  • Sports turf
  • Bricks
  • Paved surfaces

They can also create new glass containers and even stained glass.

Plastic

There are many different types of plastics, and even more potential applications. Recycling workers must separate all your plastic products based on type. They then shred them into flakes and melt them into pellets to sell to companies. Here’s how people reuse different types of plastics:

  • High-density polyethylene: car parts, toys, flower pots
  • PET: carpet backing, backpacks, sleeping bag insulation
  • Mixed plastics: plastic lumber, pallets

It’s exciting to think about what your plastic products might become. A milk jug could become a chair, or a detergent bottle could become a Frisbee.

Paper

As with plastic, manufacturers sort paper by type. At a paper mill, manufacturers follow these steps:

  • They use a chemical wash to separate the ink from the paper.
  • They mix the paper with water to create a pulp.
  • They remove contaminants and bleach the paper mixture.
  • They use machines to remove water from the mixture.
  • They place the mixture into rollers that dry and flatten it.

Through this process, manufacturers can produce new paper (or other items such as toilet paper).

Cardboard

When you recycle shoe boxes, cereal boxes, or other cardboard items, they could return as boxes or paper bags.

When a paper mill receives your cardboard, manufacturers create a pulp, just like they do with other kinds of paper. They add wood chip pulp to strengthen it. They then roll and dry it to create two kinds of cardboard: the inner layer (called the medium) and the outer layers (called the linerboard). Finally, they send both types of cardboard to a box-board plant, where manufacturers form it into new cardboard.

The next time you’re about to throw away that milk jug or that cereal box, place them in the recycling bin instead. Your recycled items actually do make a difference. They go through a comprehensive process to become new items. If you don’t have a recycling service in your area, talk to your landlord or manager about adding one. In the meantime, you can take your recyclables to a recycling center.

7 Signs Your Property Needs a Demolition, Not Just a Renovation

Written by Tri State Disposal. Posted in Uncategorized

When most people love the location, but hate the house, they renovate. However, in some cases, the house might not even merit a renovation. Keep your budget, your patience, and your housing dreams safe by demolishing your home instead if you find yourself in any of the situations listed below. If the signs below seem familiar, you’ll benefit from a complete do-over rather than a renovation.

1. The House Has a Faulty Foundation or Other Structural Issues That Are Beyond Repair

This point should be one of the biggest factors in your decision. Do you notice cracks or buckling in your foundation? Have the structural supports in your walls and ceilings stayed strong and firm? If you have noticed severe problems with your home’s structure, or if you’ve noticed extensive moisture and mold damage in different areas, you might want to completely rebuild instead of simply renovating that portion.

However, a home only needs a complete rebuild if it has extensive damage. If you only see problems in one room (and you like the house otherwise), then you should only renovate. Call a local housing contractor to inspect the damage to your home if you can’t tell how much it has spread.

2. Local Councils and Other Organizations Have Height, Width, and Length Restrictions

If local HOAs and government agencies do not allow you to add rooms to your home, but you hate your home’s current layout, you might want to demolish and rebuild. However, before you take this step, make sure you know the structure placement restrictions for your area. They may have changed since contractors built your home, and you may have less space to rebuild than you think.

3. Your Property Doesn’t Give You Space for Additions

Maybe your HOA or local council have nothing to do with your decision. You should still check on their restrictions, but if you’ve already filled your property so much that you can’t add new nooks or rooms, their word doesn’t matter so much. You’ll have to knock down your house anyway to get the layout and space that you need.

However, remember that if you already like your house enough, a rebuild simply for this reason might not merit the expense. Consider knocking out some walls or finishing a basement, garage, or attic instead.

4. Your Home Requires So Many Renovations That It Costs More Than a New Home

Your budget should be a major factor in your decision as well. If you will spend more money on extensive renovations than you would if you built a new home, then you might as well build a new home. Do not spend money unnecessarily.

5. You Don’t Own a Historically Significant Building, but It Is an Old One

An old building will not last as long as a new one, so if you plan to live in your home for decades to come, and you don’t like the problems that come with its age, knock it down and start fresh. However, when you own a historically significant building, think twice. It may have legal protections. It may also have cultural significance for your community, and you might face backlash if you ruin or change it.

6. You Have No Emotional Attachment to the House’s Current Materials and Layout

If you just can’t stand the sight of your home’s interior or exterior because of its cramped spaces and outdated features, go ahead and knock it down. Just make sure your budget can weather the expense first.

7. Your Property Would Be More Marketable as a Vacant Lot

Maybe you want to sell your property before a move, but you know that the house makes the land worth less, not more. Take this opportunity to demolish the structure and sell your home as a vacant lot. People who want custom homes will jump at the opportunity.

Demolish the home on your property if you find yourself in any of the above circumstances. But don’t tackle this project on your own. Make sure you hire a professional to do it for you so you can avoid mishaps.

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